Media Studies (MDIA)

MDIA 1130. Introduction to Media Writing. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Studies degree. Survey of media writing with an emphasis on Associated Press (AP) style. Requires writing media pieces for print, broadcast, and online news; specialized stories; public relations; marketing and advertising. Includes interviewing, applicable laws, and ethics. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and apply writing style differences among print, digital and broadcast media. 2. Develop articles in inverted pyramid and feature styles, including effective leads. 3. Compose effective content for multiple media. 4. Apply knowledge of AP Style. 5. Develop proficiency in editing for grammar, vocabulary and spelling errors. 6. Compare and contrast media jobs. 7. Identify legal and ethical issues in media. 8. Demonstrate the ability to meet and manage deadlines. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D. FA, SP.

MDIA 1380. Introduction to Video Production. 2 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Studies degree. Provides an introduction to live media production through basic television and video theories and studio exercises. Students will become familiar with the processes and terminology involved in creating a completed television/video program. Students will learn about, and practice on, various pieces of production equipment in a video studio, and have opportunities to learn and practice the skills of each of the technical positions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the basic terminology and concepts of television production. 2. Explain and apply the theories of television production to the interplay of visual and auditory elements within the television studio. 3. Apply basic skills in the operation of the various instruments within the television studio, including cameras, lights, scenery, microphones, switchers, and audio boards. 4. Apply skills in the various production positions such as producer, director, assistant director, camera operator, floor manager, and audio engineer. 5. Apply skills in the processes of studio production, including pre-production, production, and post production. Corequisites: MDIA 1385. FA, SP.

MDIA 1385. Introduction to Video Production Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of MDIA 1380. For Media Studies majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working on TV Production projects with the Community Education Channel, Utah Tech's on-campus TV station (requires 2-6 lab hours per week). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the basic terminology and concepts of television production. 2. Explain and apply the theories of television production to the interplay of visual and auditory elements within the television studio. 3. Apply basic skills in the operation of the various instruments within the television studio, including cameras, lights, scenery, microphones, switchers, and audio boards. 4. Apply skills in the various production positions such as producer, director, assistant director, camera operator, floor manager, and audio engineer. 5. Apply skills in the processes of studio production, including pre-production, production, and post production. Corequisites: MDIA 1380. FA, SP.

MDIA 1500. Introduction to Media Tools. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media, required of Media Studies Majors. Examines the technical aspects of media production. The course includes production of graphics, videos, audio, print media, and other media forms. Students will be prepared with foundational aspects of media theory and production that will be further developed in future courses. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the history, issues, and trends surrounding different aspects of mass communication through readings, lectures, and writing assignments. 2. Explain the history, issues, and trends surrounding different aspects of mediated communication. 3. Explain how mediated communication impacts the lives of individual students and society in general. 4. Apply an understanding of the above concepts in oral presentations. FA, SP.

MDIA 1560. Introduction to Audio Production. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Studies degree. Develops beginning audio production skills for radio, television, motion picture, and online environments, including generating and editing audio for broadcast stations and new media. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply basic working skills and knowledge of physical and digital audio consoles, interfaces, and peripheral devices. 2. Apply knowledge of associated equipment to perform audio capture, manipulation/mixing and recording in live and studio environments. 3. Apply knowledge of basic single and multi-tracking audio recording, editing, and saving on Adobe Audition. 4. Apply knowledge of Audio Dialogue Replacement (ADR) via Adobe Audition and Adobe Premier. 5. Apply basic critical and analytical listening skills related to audio production. 6. Produce and record Foley sound effects. 7. Create and upload audio content to an online presence such as YouTube or podcasting. FA, SP.

MDIA 2010. Media and Pop Culture (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement, and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Studies degree. Examines relationships between mass communication and society from a variety of theoretical perspectives and social concerns, including roles and performance of contemporary media content; critical evaluation of the uses and effects of media; how contemporary news, entertainment, and advertising content shared a culture's understanding of women, minorities, children, and other groups; and basic media ethics and laws. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply a critical approach to the history, technology, economy, theory and regulations of various mass media. 2. Explain the multi-faceted connections between American culture and the media. 3. Explain the techniques and institutions of contemporary commercial communication. 4. Apply knowledge of the present and future of the media, including but not limited to individual media use of both traditional and new media tools. 5. Explain how new media tools do, and will continue to, influence our society. 6. Explain how new media affects individuals' communicative perceptions and actions. FA, SP.

MDIA 2210R. Journalism Practicum I. 1-3 Hours.

Open to all students interested in a practicum experience with Sun News Daily, the university's student journalism organization, as reporters, photographers, designers, producers and editors. Provides hands-on experience in most facets of journalism, including writing, photojournalism, video production, social media and graphic design. Some evening work reporting or editing may be required. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 6 hours per week for 1 credit, 12 hours per week for 2 credits, or 18 hours per week for 3 credits. Variable credit 1.0 - 3.0. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create journalistic work that is accurate, interesting and complete. 2. Apply AP Style and other writing rules in accordance with industry standards. 3. Demonstrate ability to meet and manage deadlines. 4. Explain news production in a digital, multimedia environment. 5. Develop story ideas. 6. Produce social media content to self-promote and generate audience interest. 7. Compile a resume and portfolio with clips. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1130 and instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 2300. Introduction to Public Relations. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Public Relations emphasis in the Media Studies degree. A survey of concepts, issues, and principles for students interested in public relations and advertising. The course focuses on examining the Public Relations industry. Topics of study include the history, functions, theories, and career options of the public relations industry. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental theories and best practices of public relations. 2. Evaluate media production and consumption within the public relations industry based on professional criteria and standards. 3. Produce public relations content in compliance with technical and aesthetic principles based on in-depth analysis of the audience and situation. 4. List examples of career options in public relations based on interview data. FA, SP.

MDIA 2340R. Public Relations Practicum I. 1-3 Hours.

Open to all students interested in a practicum experience with the university's student-run public relations agency. Provides hands-on experience in most facets of public relations, including strategic planning, corporate identity and branding, media relations, product launches and event planning, community and government relations, and digital media strategy. Students will conduct market research, develop communication strategies and tactics, create press kits, pitch stories to reporters, generate publicity, develop social networking accounts, and evaluate key messaging for client organizations. This course allows students to explore and apply content learned in the course in a professional experience away from the classroom. Variable credit 1-3. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Conduct applied market research in order to develop specific communication goals; create relevant messages and strategies; and evaluate the efficacy of those messages. 2. Create messages in compliance with the technical and aesthetic principles of the media being used. 3. Summarize best practices and benchmarks within the public relations industry. 4. Develop practical experiences in order to build portfolios and resumes. 5. Develop relationships with clients by learning how to navigate client meetings, build trust, and demonstrate professionalism. Prerequisites: instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 2370R. Live Media Practicum I. 1-3 Hours.

For Media Studies majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working on live media production projects with the Community Education Channel, the university's on-campus TV station. Students will learn and practice basic live production skills including technical directing, camera operation and instant replay operation. Students work on productions such as university athletics, local high school football and basketball, news shows, talk shows, cooking shows and more. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 3 hours per week for 1 credit, 5 hours per week for 2 credits, or 7 hours per week for 3 credits. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisites may be overridden with Instructor signature. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate basic understanding of the production requirements from concept to completion of a live broadcast, including pre-production, production, and post-production. 2. Apply knowledge of all positions in a mobile and stationary studio and how they relate to each other to produce a live broadcast, and be able to explain the value of working as a team. 3. Demonstrate the skills to operate various instruments used within a live broadcast from a remote location (Cameras, Replay machine, Audio equipment, Switcher control panel, etc.). 4. Apply the skills of various production positions such as Technical Director, Camera Operator, Replay Operator, etc. 5. Apply the skills of a primary production position, chosen from assignments that may include Technical Director, Camera Operator, Replay Operator, as well as other production positions. 6. Apply professional principles and practices (i.e. show up on time, come prepared to work, have shifts covered if necessary, no mobile device use, etc.). Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1380, and MDIA 1385, and Instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 2380R. Radio Practicum I. 1-3 Hours.

Open to all students as well as Media Studies majors interested in a Practicum Experience on the university's radio station and a variety of other audio formats. Includes FCC regulations. Basic programming skills, news and sports production, music programming, etc. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 6 hours per week for 1 credit, 12 hours per week for 2 credits, or 18 hours per week for 3 credits. Variable credit: 1.0 - 3.0. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply effective radio production, writing, recording, and editing. 2. Apply effective radio promotional principles and practices. 3. Apply effective radio programming, preparation, on-air delivery and air check. 4. Collaborate with the public in both on-air and off-air situations. 5. Demonstrate competency with automation software including scheduling software. 6. Develop a competitive radio resume through work at the student radio stations. 7. Explain FCC rules and regulations with regard to radio production and broadcasting. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1560 (Grade C- or higher), and Instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 2390R. Video Practicum I. 1-3 Hours.

Open to all students interested in a hands-on practicum experience in video production, including leadership roles and more advanced techniques in episodic, non-narrative and narrative video storytelling. Experience will be gained in pre-production skills such as ideation, scripting, storyboarding, producing, planning and managing video shoots. Production skills include operating camera equipment (DSLR, camcorder and other formats), audio equipment and lighting equipment as well as principles of professional videography. Post-production skills include audio mixing and mastering, video editing, color correcting, and after effects. Variable credit 1-3. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) ** At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Operate as an efficient member of a professional video production team in any number of capacities, from director to gaffer. 2. Demonstrate intermediate to advanced functions in video and animation editing software 3. Produce quality footage for entertainment, marketing, and news media. 4. Apply creative decision making in lighting, mise-en-scene, cinematography, music, framing and other current standards of mediated communication. Prerequisites: MDIA 1500. FA, SP.

MDIA 2460. Introduction to New Media Production. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media: required in the Social Media emphasis in Media Studies. Covers theory relevant to structuring content for converged access. Develops desktop video production skills by producing news releases and support material, focusing on acquiring, digitizing, editing, and distributing digital video information. Combined lecture/lab. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create and maintain a blog. 2. Produce digital audio content for a pod cast posted to your blog. 3. Shoot and enhance photos and upload them to your blog. 4. Compose a coherent story with images. 5. Produce and publish your video to your blog. 6. Evaluate the efficacy of your blog. Course fee required. Prerequisite: MDIA 1500 (Grade C or higher). FA.

MDIA 2630. Script Writing and Planning. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media. Teaches the basics of creative screenwriting, narrative structure and idea generation. Experience will be gained in creative screenwriting as well as professional storyboarding techniques, budgeting, and equipment planning and preparation. By the end of the course students will produce complete pre-production packets such as those used in professional enterprise. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Write creative short scripts for entertainment, marketing or news purposes. 2. Create a detailed storyboard for use in visual storytelling 3. Create a detailed budget video production budget and defend your choices. 4. Produce an equipment list demonstrating solid anticipation of unforeseen circumstances. 5. Create a pre-production packet utilizing industry-standard best-practices that clearly demonstrates the creative scope of the project, the story, budget, and the intended audience or outcome. FA (odd).

MDIA 3060. Media Analysis and Critique. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Studies degree. By watching and analyzing media from various ages and accurately describing their unique storytelling or informative properties students will be able to duplicate these techniques. Students will gain an understanding of how media producers created and utilized the equipment and techniques, which grew to a powerful means of storytelling. Special attention will be devoted to examples of campaign ideation and creation, film and video storytelling, podcasting, written content and more. Students will also be exposed to various critical methodologies, terms, and styles to correctly identify and express their instinctual reaction to media. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Analyze a producer's skill by viewing media as product, consisting of hundreds of interrelated parts that make up a cohesive unit. 2. Simulate media aesthetics and principles based on examples seen in the classroom. 3. Produce entertaining and informative media critique in either written, video, or audio format that demonstrates clear understanding of key terms and critical movements. 4. Make a persuasive argument for why a piece of media has succeeded or failed using terms, techniques and ideas that can be explained to the layperson. FA, SP.

MDIA 3210R. Journalism Practicum II. 1-3 Hours.

Open to all students interested in a practicum experience with Sun News Daily, the university's student journalism organization, as reporters, photographers, designers, producers and editors. Provides hands-on experience in most facets of journalism, including writing, photojournalism, video production, social media and graphic design. Some evening work reporting or editing may be required. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 6 hours per week for 1 credit, 12 hours per week for 2 credits, or 18 hours per week for 3 credits. Variable credit 1.0 - 3.0. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create effective journalistic work. 2. Apply AP Style in accordance with industry standards. 3. Meet and manage deadlines. 4. Explain multiple aspects of news production. 5. Develop story ideas. 6. Self-promote and generate audience interest (social chatter) through social media. 7. Build a resume/portfolio with clips. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 2210R and instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 3370R. Live Media Practicum II. 1-3 Hours.

For Media Studies majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working on live media production projects with the Community Education Channel, the university's on-campus TV station. Students will learn and practice advanced live media production skills including directing, technical directing, camera operation and instant replay operation, and commentating and sideline reporting for sports and other live and pre-recorded content. Students work on productions such as university athletics, local high school football and basketball, news shows, talk shows, cooking shows and more. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 4 hours per week for 1 credit, 6 hours per week for 2 credits, or 8 hours per week for 3 credits. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply knowledge of production requirements from concept to completion of a live broadcast, including pre-production, production, and post-production. 2. Apply knowledge of all positions in a mobile and stationary studio and how they relate to each other to produce a live broadcast, and be able to explain the value of working as a team. 3. Demonstrate the ability to operate various instruments used within a live broadcast from a remote location (Cameras, Replay machine, Audio equipment, Switcher control panel, etc.). 4. Demonstrate proficiency in the various production positions such as Producer, Director, Technical Director, Camera Operator, Replay Operator, On-Air Talent, etc. 5. Demonstrate proficiency at a primary and secondary production position, chosen from assignments that may include Producer, Director, Technical Director, Camera Operator, Replay Operator or On-Air Talent, as well as other production positions. 6. Employ principles and practices of the television production profession. 7. Produce and gather material that can later be used on a resume and/or in a portfolio. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1380 and MDIA 1385 and Instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 3380R. Radio Practicum II. 1-3 Hours.

Fulfills Media Studies emphasis elective degree requirements. Open to all students as well as Media Studies majors interested in a practicum experience on the university's radio station in leadership, production, and managerial functions. Includes instruction in the philosophy of media and sound, the history of radio, and the analysis of the role of radio in society. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 6 hours per week for 1 credit, 12 hours per week for 2 credits, or 18 hours per week for 3 credits. Variable credit: 1.0 - 3.0. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply effective radio production, writing, recording, and editing. 2. Apply effective radio promotional principles and practices. 3. Apply effective radio programming, preparation, on-air delivery and air check. 4. Collaborate with the public in both on-air and off-air situations. 5. Demonstrate proficiency with automation software including scheduling software. 6. Develop a competitive radio resume through work at the student radio stations. 7. Explain FCC rules and regulations with regard to radio production and broadcasting. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 2380R AND Instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 3390R. Video Practicum II. 1-3 Hours.

Open to all students interested in a hands-on practicum experience in video production, including leadership roles and more advanced techniques in episodic, non-narrative and narrative video storytelling. Experience will be gained in pre-production skills such as ideation, scripting, storyboarding, producing, planning and managing video shoots. Production skills include operating camera equipment (DSLR, camcorder and other formats), audio equipment and lighting equipment as well as principles of professional videography. Post-production skills include audio mixing and mastering, video editing, color correcting, and after effects. Variable credit 1-3. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Operate as an efficient member of a professional video production team in any number of capacities, from director to gaffer. 2. Demonstrate advanced functions in video and animation editing software 3. Produce quality footage for entertainment, marketing, and news media. 4. Apply creative decision making in lighting, mise-en-scene, cinematography, music, framing and other current standards of mediated communication. 5. Lead a team of novice students on video shoots and make motivated decisions to efficiently gather content. Prerequisites: MDIA 2390R or instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 3410. Gender, Race and Class in Media. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Studies degree. Gender in Media explores the relationship among men, women, race, class, culture and the media. Includes discussions of representations in media; impact of representations on audiences; stereotypes of gender, race, class, and sexual identity; effects of media on identity construction; and applicable theories. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and explain effects of media on identity construction. 2. Explain how gender and culture affect media production. 3. Assess gender depictions, including stereotypes, in news, television, advertising, film and digital culture. 4. Analyze media depictions with theoretical arguments. 5. Develop an analytical attitude toward gender and media in everyday life. FA, SP.

MDIA 3450. Social Media Campaigns. 3 Hours.

Required for all Media Studies majors. Teaches the planning and creation of effective social media campaigns and community management. This course discusses the implications of social media platforms as business and communication tools, helping students master bidding strategies, audience creation, messaging and maintenance. Students will gain firsthand knowledge of how to ideate, budget, and set a social marketing plan in motion. Students will analyze the best social media campaigns for best-practices and industry-standard techniques. Qualifies students for social media management or marketing careers. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLO's) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify and describe the interrelated components of effective social media campaigns. 2. Make data-motivated decisions to produce social media campaigns for a variety of entities. 3. Access and interpret analytics to evaluate the effectiveness of your campaign for reach, awareness, authority and more. 4. Determine appropriate social media campaign ends for a variety of businesses. 5. Analyze trends and utilize strategic means to maximize sharing and reach. FA, SP.

MDIA 3480. Social Media Production. 3 Hours.

For all Media Studies majors; required in the Public Relations emphasis in the Media Studies degree. Provides students with the techniques, tools and experience to be clear, effective storytellers on a variety of social media platforms. Course focuses on content creation techniques to produce effective, "spreadable" social media products in video, photography and animation for marketing, entertainment or personal expression to help students enter careers in social media management, content marketing or entertainment. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify and describe quality social media content. 2. Use motivated creative decisions to direct and produce social media content for entertainment, marketing, news or personal expression. 3. Use video and photo editing software to create engaging, entertaining short content. 4. Create stories for audience engagement across current social media platforms. 5. Analyze trends and utilize strategic means to maximize sharing and reach. Prerequisites: MDIA 1500. FA.

MDIA 3530. Photojournalism. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required in the Multimedia Journalism emphasis for the Media Studies degree. Covers advanced techniques in digital acquisition and manipulation of still images for converged journalism. Covers exposure using digital tools, impacts of the frame in composing for the story, editing for publication, digital darkroom fundamentals, and photojournalism ethics in the digital domain. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply various photography skills, including manipulating the variables of exposure, executing compositional factors, utilizing existing light for exposure and impact, and exploiting photographic variables for different contexts. 2. Develop plan, and shoot photo essays and other photojournalistic assignments. 3. Apply skills to edit shots for publication 4. Evaluate cameras, lenses and other photographic instruments for journalism applications. 5. Describe and apply legal considerations and the journalistic code of ethics. SP.

MDIA 3550. Intermediate Media Tools. 3 Hours.

Required for all Media Studies majors. Introduces students to new techniques and deepens their understanding of the tools required to produce professional media products. A tools- and skills-focused course, Intermediate Media Tools gives students the practical know-how to produce semi-professional videos for streaming or broadcast, audio podcasts and other elements. Students will gain experience in using media tools including Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, Audition, Resolution and others. Students will master techniques such as editing for narrative storytelling, sound mixing, and animation. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Use media software tools to tell short, non-episodic narratives in audio, video, photo or print. 2. Apply the basics of narrative to inform, entertain, or engage audiences in a variety of formats 3. Demonstrate a clear grasp of broadcast and streaming technology as well as how to manipulate that technology for entertainment, marketing or news content. 4. Create professional, smooth animation using either organic or geometric shapes. 5. Define and explain how technology and tools can aid in effective media practices. Prerequisites: MDIA 1500. FA, SP.

MDIA 3560. Visual Communication. 3 Hours.

For all Media Studies majors, required in the Social Media emphasis. An introduction to visual communication as manifested in photography, television, motion pictures, the Internet, and other visual media in order to obtain a basic understanding of the physical and cognitive processes of visual communication, the elements of visual messages, and principles of visual organization that can affect perception, such as Gestalt, framing, vectors, motion, color, and typestyles. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the transactional communication concepts of context and noise relating to the perceptual process of visual communication design. 2. Categorize visual communication effects in affective, cognitive and psychomotor responses. 3. Assess the influence of typestyles on messages and develop your own font. 4. Identify primary forms of contrast in composition and layout design and execute applications in your own original media design. 5. Identify and execute compositional forces of framing, vectors, motion, in visual design applications of motion and still photography. 6. Explain and apply original media design Gestalt principles. 7. Create and produce effectively designed media in your choice of domains including packaging, collateral, exhibit, converged media, identity, print, motion and still imaging. 8. Critique and evaluate visual communication design in all domains. 9. Collaborate with other student designers in producing a campaign. Prerequisite: MDIA 1500 (Grade C or higher). FA.

MDIA 3580. Case Studies in Public Relations. 3 Hours.

For all Media Studies majors, required in the Public Relations emphasis. Challenges students to identify and demonstrate effective public relations problem solving strategies. Strategies in a variety of different areas such as media relations, corporate social responsibility, conflict management, activism, entertainment, and consumer, community, and investor relations are addressed. Using case studies, the course presents students with practical problems within the field of public relations. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify classic public relations cases throughout history and use those lessons to inform current practice. 2. Assess diverse public relations situations and apply appropriate public relations strategies and tactics to address them. 3. Critique different approaches to public relations research, strategy, implementation, and evaluation. 4. Analyze and critically evaluate the ethical and cultural issues connected to public relations practice. 5. Develop the skills to communicatively handle and respond to public disasters or media crises. FA.

MDIA 3610. Copy Editing. 3 Hours.

For all Media Studies majors, required in the Multimedia Journalism emphasis in the Media Studies degree. Students will develop good writing and editing skills as they pertain to media writing, including news, features, broadcast scripts, print and digital publication content and design, and visual storytelling. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Develop a comprehensive understanding of the English language and AP Style. 2. Rewrite copy into a version that is accurate, fair, complete and readable. 3. Identify problems and appropriate solutions in copy and publications. 4. Write effective headlines, captions and other display copy. 5. Apply design concepts and analyze visual appeal. 6. Explain legal and ethical aspects of editing. Prerequisites: MDIA 1130. SP (odd).

MDIA 3750. Advanced Streaming Production. 2 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Production emphasis in the Media Studies degree. Provides students an opportunity to master video production and editing techniques for streaming media services such as YouTube, TikTok and more. Students will practice principles and tools of video lighting, audio, and camera techniques as well as editing. Students will export finished products, from short videos to streaming series, for various forms of distribution. Editing tools taught include advanced visual effects, animation, color correction and more. Perfect for students interested in content production, PR, marketing and social media creation jobs. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLO's) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify and describe quality streaming content utilizing correct terminology 2. Explain and apply creative concepts of lighting, audio capture and cinematography. 3. Use DSLR and other camera technology to capture professional-quality video and audio. 4. Design a streaming content production schedule 5. Create and maintain a streaming content channel. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1380, MDIA 1385 and MDIA 3550. Corequisites: MDIA 3755. SP.

MDIA 3755. Advanced Streaming Production Lab. 1 Hour.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Production emphasis in the Media Studies degree. Provides students an opportunity to master video production and editing techniques for streaming media services such as YouTube, TikTok and more. Students will practice principles and tools of video lighting, audio, and camera techniques as well as editing. Students will export finished products, from short videos to streaming series, for various forms of distribution. Editing tools taught include advanced visual effects, animation, color correction and more. Perfect for students interested in content production, PR, marketing and social media creation jobs. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Identify and describe quality streaming content utilizing correct terminology 2. Explain and apply creative concepts of lighting, audio capture and cinematography. 3. Use DSLR and other camera technology to capture professional-quality video and audio. 4. Design a streaming content production schedule 5. Create and maintain a streaming content channel. Prerequisites: MDIA 1380, MDIA 1385 and MDIA 3550. Corequisites: MDIA 3750. SP.

MDIA 4330. New Media Applications. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media, required in the Social Media emphasis of Media Studies. Surveys new developments and applications in converged media, including seeking, using, and evaluating developing technologies focused on communicating, entertaining, and informing, as well as the impact on publishing and broadcasting. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain societal impact of new media applications on individual and group communication. 2. Integrate aspects of old media in new media. 3. Assess implications and trends of new media applications. 4. Identify new technologies in the marketplace. 5. Assess market and user impacts from new media applications. SP.

MDIA 4360. Media Ethics and Law. 3 Hours.

Required of Media Studies majors and open to other interested students. Addresses legal and ethical considerations for media practitioners by exploring the historical and philosophical underpinnings of media law and ethics. Students will review major cases that have produced current legal standards and analyze cases using ethical decision-making strategies. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of major legal precedents in media law. 2. Describe major current developments in issues and rulings regarding media law. 3. Identify and correct potentially-illegal media content and/or practices. 4. Recognize ethical issues inherent in media theory and practice. 5. Identify, use, compare and contrast major ethical approaches and decision making strategies. 6. Analyze media messages, issues and cases in terms of their ethical implications. FA, SP.

MDIA 4380. Advanced Live Media Production. 2 Hours.

Fulfills Media Production emphasis requirements. For Media Studies majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working on live media production projects. Opportunities include working with the Community Education Channel, Utah Tech's on-campus TV station. Students will write, produce, direct and, if desired, star in their own live media televised and live streamed content. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Supervise a live media production crew. 2. Write production rundowns or scripts in the proper format. 3. Demonstrate ability to act as producer and director for live media productions. 4. Develop a complete live media production suitable for television or internet distribution. 5. Apply all stages of live media production, including preproduction, production, and postproduction. Prerequisites: MDIA 1380. Corequisites: MDIA 4385. SP.

MDIA 4385. Advanced Live Media Production Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of MDIA 4380. Fulfills Media Production emphasis requirements. For Media Studies majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working on live media production projects. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Supervise a live media production crew. 2. Write production rundowns or scripts in the proper format. 3. Demonstrate ability to act as producer and director for live media productions. 4. Develop a complete live media production suitable for television or internet distribution. 5. Apply all stages of live media production, including preproduction, production, and postproduction. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1385. Corequisites: MDIA 4380. SP.

MDIA 4440R. Public Relations Practicum II (ALPP). 1-3 Hours.

Required for the Public Relations emphasis in Media Studies. Open to all students interested in a practicum experience with the university's student-run public relations agency. Provides hands-on experience in most facets of public relations, including strategic planning, corporate identity and branding, media relations, product launches and event planning, community and government relations, and digital media strategy. Students will conduct market research, develop communication strategies and tactics, create press kits, pitch stories to reporters, generate publicity, develop social networking accounts, and evaluate key messaging for client organizations. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 6 hours per week for 1 credit, 12 hours per week for 2 credits, or 18 hours per week for 3 credits. Variable credit 1-3. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. This course is designated as an Active Learning Professional Practice (ALPP) course. This course allows students to explore and apply content learned in the course in a professional experience away from the classroom. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Conduct applied market research in order to develop specific communication goals; create relevant messages and strategies; and evaluate the efficacy of those messages. 2. Create messages in compliance with the technical and aesthetic principles of the media being used. 3. Summarize best practices and benchmarks within the public relations industry. 4. Develop practical experiences in order to build portfolios and resumes. 5. Develop relationships with clients by learning how to navigate client meetings, build trust, and demonstrate professionalism. Prerequisites: MDIA 1500 and MDIA 2300 (both Grade C- or higher), and instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 4450. Media Research. 3 Hours.

One of two courses that will fulfill the research methods course requirement for Media Studies majors. Focuses on Media-specific quantitative, qualitative, and critical research methodologies through a process of research design and analysis. Students will learn applied research topics, including audience research, media effects research, and/or strategic communication research. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Write a properly formatted research proposal for a media research project. 2. Explain how quantitative, qualitative, and critical research can be applied to media settings. 3. Apply media theory to questions in media research. 4. Critically analyze case study research projects in media research. 5. Be fully prepared to execute an applied media research project. Prerequisite: MDIA 3060 (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

MDIA 4550. Advanced Media Tools. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for the Media Production emphasis in the Media Studies degree. Hones and perfects students' skills in all aspects of digital media production, mastering software and hardware required to become expert storytellers in any medium. Advanced techniques may include complete color correction, green screen compositing, after effects animation and more. After this course students become perfect candidates for any video production, content marketing, PR, or media management jobs. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Use media software tools to tell short, non-episodic narratives in audio, video, photo or print. 2. Use green screen compositing and other techniques to create compelling content 3. Create an audio podcast space that uses a variety of techniques to create mood and rich audio story space. 4. Create professional, smooth animation using current best-practices. 5. Use video and photo editing suites to create professional, compelling content for entertainment, marketing or journalistic purposes. Prerequisites: MDIA 3550. SP (odd).

MDIA 4580. Advanced Public Relations. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media; required for Public Relations emphasis in the Media Studies degree. Designed for students to apply public relations techniques to campaign development for an actual client. Campaigns will include extensive research, planning, execution, and evaluation elements. This course will also challenge students to identify and demonstrate effective public relations problem solving strategies in a variety of different areas, such as media relations, corporate social responsibility, conflict management, activism, entertainment, and consumer, community, and investor relations. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Distinguish the various phases of public relations campaign planning. 2. Design a public relations campaign plan for a client. 3. Produce, analyze, and report results from primary and secondary research. 4. Analyze communication problems from a public relations perspective, develop practical solutions, and apply key terms and tools. 5. Evaluate global and cross-cultural perspectives in public relations cases. Prerequisites: MDIA 2300. SP.

MDIA 4640. Advanced Media Writing. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in media writing, required in the Multimedia Journalism and Public Relations emphases in Media Studies. Explores styles and topics of feature and opinion writing for newspapers, magazines, blogs and websites for the purposes of entertaining, informing, and persuading. Students will write and workshop original nonfiction with the aim of being published. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Develop feature and op-ed story ideas. 2. Apply effective methods for interviewing. 3. Write using established feature and op-ed story structures and techniques. 4. Determine potential markets for ideas and submit freelance projects. 5. Design a professional portfolio. Prerequisites: MDIA 1130. FA (even).

MDIA 4680. Multimedia Journalism. 3 Hours.

For Media Studies majors, required in the Multimedia Journalism emphasis. Provides students with advanced training in all aspects of journalism - reporting, writing, video and audio production, social media and blogging - and how to integrate these skills in the digital environment. Students will produce an online portfolio of work that can be used to secure future employment. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Increase journalistic writing and reporting skills. 2. Demonstrate competency in video/audio production and editing. 3. Explain how to present multimedia stories in exciting new ways while maintaining traditional journalism standards of fairness, accuracy and quality. 4. Use software to customize media distribution platforms and publish stories online. 5. Produce stories that combine media elements, including text, images, audio, video and interactive graphics, culminating in a professional portfolio. 6. Identify and analyze storytelling techniques and tools adopted by the news industry to take advantage of the opportunities offered by digital technologies. Course fee required. Prerequisites: MDIA 1130 and MDIA 1380 and MDIA 1385. SP.

MDIA 4790. Advanced Audio Production. 3 Hours.

Examines real-world sound environments in producing and developing essential design and mixing skills through hands on application of the software and student produced digital media using production techniques in ambient and studio production with specific skills in voice over, Foley, ADR, vocal and musical instrument mixing for live and studio environments, and addressing the theory and application for digital media/cinematic audio design, live/stage production, and studio recording, using Adobe Audition, Pro Tools and Ableton Live. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply advanced working skills and knowledge of physical and digital audio consoles, interfaces, and peripheral devices. 2. Exhibit knowledge of associated equipment to perform audio capture, manipulation/mixing and recording in live and studio environments. 3. Demonstrate knowledge of the software Pro Tools, Adobe Audition, Adobe Premier, and Ableton Live. 4. Develop skills in Voice Over, Audio Dialogue Replacement (ADR), Foley, studio and live music mixing and recording, and audio capture for digital video. 5. Evaluate different characteristics of microphones and direct applications therein. 6. Refine critical and analytical listening skills related to audio production. 7. Improve knowledge and application of the concepts of hearing, sound, transmission, recording and processing. 8. Demonstrate applied knowledge of the physics of sound as it applies to audio production. Prerequisite: MDIA 1560 (Grade C or higher). SP.

MDIA 4890R. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

For individual Media Studies majors with advanced standing who wish to pursue a specific focus of study related to their degree emphasis and/or research interest not otherwise available in the current Media Studies curriculum. Students are closely supervised by appropriate faculty in the design and successful completion of the course. The course is dependent upon a formal contractual arrangement with the faculty member that is submitted at the beginning of the semester in which coursework is undertaken, and is contingent upon the Department Chair's approval. Students meet with the faculty mentor each week and provide progress reports for feedback. Students are required meet the college requirement of 45 hours of work per credit. Variable credit 1.0-3.0. Repeatable up to 3 credits. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Complete course learning objectives written and published in the syllabus when the specific course plan is laid out. Prerequisites: Media Studies major and Instructor permission. FA, SP.

MDIA 4900R. Media Studies Internship. 3 Hours.

Required of all media majors. Designed to integrate students into professional media environments to increase competencies and initiate networking. Potential environments include broadcast and , corporate and business communication, public relations, journalism, etc. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate learning through original and creative ideas. 2. Collaborate with others to accomplish a shared purpose or goal. 3. Use appropriate strategies and tools to represent, analyze, and integrate seminar-specific knowledge. 4. Develop the ability to think critically about course content. 5. Apply knowledge from seminar to a range of contexts, problems, and solutions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

MDIA 4980. Media Studies Capstone. 3 Hours.

Required for all Media Studies majors. Students complete a culminating advanced media project that will contribute to or form a foundation for a professional portfolio that allows them to demonstrate competency in, and application of, media knowledge and skills. Through the capstone project students will demonstrate the achievement of the Media Studies Department Learning Objectives. Students will work with an instructor who approves and assesses the project. **Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Prepare a portfolio that highlights the student's strengths to advance in a media career. 2. Design and create a professional media project that demonstrates mastery of skills in the Media Studies program. Prerequisites: senior standing. FA, SP, SU.

MDIA 4990R. Seminar in Media Studies. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course is a program elective and does not fulfill general education requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses, and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate learning through original and creative ideas. 2. Collaborate with others to accomplish a shared purpose or goal. 3. Use appropriate strategies and tools to represent, analyze, and integrate seminar-specific knowledge. 4. Develop the ability to think critically about course content. 5. Apply knowledge from seminar to a range of contexts, problems, and solutions. FA, SP.