Finance (FIN)

FIN 1750. Personal Finance: Financial Citizenship in Social and Economic Systems (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Society is placing increasing responsibility on individuals for their financial well-being (e.g., retirement, health care). This course is devoted to building quantitative skills associated with individual financial decision making and analyzing the connection between individual decisions and societal well-being. This course seeks to address the "how" and "why" in personal financial decisions. Topics covered include credit/debt, property insurance, saving, and investing. The course will draw on multiple disciplines. Economics, finance, and applied mathematics are directly addressed. Public financial policy in areas of political science, law, and psychology are also discussed. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand the importance of financial literacy in the context of overall economy. 2. Identify the benefits of a properly designed personal financial plan and be able to discuss its relationship to economic conditions and personal goals. 3. Construct and implement a well-planned personal financial plan. 4. Explain the techniques of successful budgeting and asset management including the meaning and purpose of specific financial statements and records. 5. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of checking accounts and savings plans. 6. Identify the types of credit available to consumers and be able to discuss the pros and cons of using credit verses savings and cash when purchasing consumer goods. 7. Explain the factors that influence the availability of financial services and list the types of services and financial institutions commonly used by consumers. 8. Discuss factors that influence consumer-buying decisions and identify strategies for effective purchasing. 9. Describe basic consumer rights and responsibilities. 10. Describe the role of planned borrowing in personal financial management. FA, SP.

FIN 3001. Finance Intermediate Career Strategies. 1 Hour.

Business Foundations, with emphasis placed on executing successful and focused career research in Finance. Target industry sector(s) and specific opportunities within preferred sector(s) will be identified. Professional networking skills will be developed. Students will put together their career strategy document that includes short and long term career goals, and an implementation plan for achieving those goals. Students will update their career portfolio to match their career strategy. It is recommended that students take this course prior to their senior year. Dual listed with ACCT 3001 or ISA 3001 (students may only take one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Conduct a targeted career search related to individual skills, interest, and current career opportunities. 2. Create and maintain a professional network that will support a targeted career search. 3. Create a customized resume for each identified career opportunity. 4. Create a Personal Career Portfolio, presenting academic work product germane to their targeted career search. 5. Demonstrate a professional manner during phone and personal interviews. Prerequisites: Recommended SSC 1010, or BUS 1050, or BUS 2000. FA, SP.

FIN 3100. Financial Planning for Professionals. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as an introductory course for students who have interest in or who are currently pursuing a career in the Personal Financial Planning profession. In addition to covering an overview of the profession and the process, the course will focus on using tools such as the financial calculator, personal financial statement analysis, cash and debt management, housing, and education funding. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs)** At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and apply the financial planning process and CFP Board's Code of Ethics and Standards of Conduct. 2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the Personal Financial Planning profession. 3. Create and analyze personal financial statements. 4. Apply the time value of money to calculate saving needs for various goals. 5. Propose appropriate cash management and debt-related recommendations that meet specific needs and goals. 6. Classify consumer laws that impact clients, including bankruptcy, banking, credit, privacy regulations, and other relevant laws 7. Compare and contrast strategies for education funding and make recommendations based on analysis. FA (even).

FIN 3150. Managerial Finance I. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing majors and emphases in the School of Business. Covers fundamentals necessary to analyze financial statements, including statement of cash flows and financial ratio analysis, identifying financial management goals, time value of money, valuation, risk and return characteristics, and capital and cash budgeting. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the role of finance within a firm. 2. Analyze financial statements. 3. Apply time-value-of-money as financial analysis tool. 4. Appraise and interpret the value of financial assets (bonds & stocks) using time value of money. 5. Identify and quantify financial risk and its role in financial decision making. 6 Analyze and appraise capital budgeting projects. 7. Synthesize financial analysis results to make managerial and financial decisions. 8. Assess ethical issues in finance. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010; and MATH 1040 or STAT 2040; and ECON 2010. FA, SP.

FIN 3200. Money, Banking, & Credit. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Covers monetary standards, organization and functioning of the credit system and the Federal Reserve System, problems of money, prices, and credit control, while emphasizing recent monetary and banking trends. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the essential vocabulary and concepts that relate to the financial system, monetary system, monetary policy, interest rates, and various financial securities traded in the financial markets. 2. Evaluate the effects of various economic events and central bank policies with regard to interest rates, the bond market, the money supply, inflation, and real GDP. 3. Discuss various ethical issues and conflicts of interest in financial markets. 4. Analyze a financial market and make a professional group presentation on the various aspects of the market and its participants. 5. Define and evaluate various Derivatives. 6. Explain how financial markets, institutions, an instruments allow (and restrict) various risk shifting strategies. 7. Analyze various financial markets (e.g., the New York Stock Exchange, Nasdaq, the Treasury market, the foreign exchange market), and financial institutions (e.g., commercial and investment banks, brokerages, mutual fund companies). Prerequisites: FIN 3150 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA.

FIN 3750. Introduction to Investments. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the College of Business. Overview of financial markets, investment process and transactions, investor behavior and market efficiency. Analysis and evaluation of investment return and risk. Covers different methods for valuation of financial securities like common stock, bonds and derivatives. Introduction to portfolio formation, including asset allocation and security selection, and portfolio performance measures. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze and evaluate the risk profile of different asset classes and individual securities. 2. Analyze and evaluate the return of different asset classes and individual securities. 3. Analyze and assess the value of a financial security (stock, bond, option, etc.). 4. Synthesize security analysis results in a professional report. 5. Formulate an investment recommendation. 6. Define the portfolio formation process and portfolio theory. 7. Create a mean-variance optimized portfolio. 8. Give examples of a technical trading pattern and its pros and cons. 9. Define common ethical issues relating to personal and agent investing. Prerequisites: FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 4100. Risk Management and Insurance Planning. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students who are interested in or who are currently pursuing a career in the Personal Financial Planning profession. In addition to covering an overview of the fundamentals of individual and family risk management, the course will focus on evaluating risk exposures, calculating coverage needed, utilizing various policies to meet needs, and describing the impact of governmental regulation on insurance and other benefits. **COURSE LEARING OUTCOMES (CLOs)** At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the fundamentals of risk management and explain the risk management process. 2. Analyze and evaluate risk exposures. 3. Demonstrate the ability to calculate life insurance and other insurance needs. 4. Compare how different insurance plans and annuity products work and demonstrate the ability to use them to meet client needs (including the needs of business owners).5. Identify and describe how government regulations impact insurance and other benefits. Prerequisites: FIN 3100 - Financial Planning for Professionals. SP (even).

FIN 4150. Managerial Finance II. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. In-depth treatment of capital budgeting, project valuation, risk assessment, capital structure, cash flow management, dividend policy, corporate incentive problems, agency theory, and signaling theory. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain ethical issues and responsibilities in managerial finance. 2. Explain the role of finance within the firm. 3. Analyze financial statements (balance sheets, income statements & cash flow statements) in order to identify and assess the profitability and financial risks of the company. 4. Forecast pro forma financial statements using percentage of sales and alternative methods. 5. Quantify financial risk and its role in financial decision making. 6. Perform capital budgeting analysis. 7. Perform capital structure analysis and recommend capital structure options. 8. Assess business opportunities and projects and recommend course of action. 9. Apply sensitivity and scenario analysis to the analysis and decision making process. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. FA.

FIN 4180. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Hours.

Explores the finance management topics specifically for entrepreneurial ventures from the perspective of the entrepreneur and the financiers. Focuses on creating a financial plan for new or young ventures, determining the capital needs, the process for raising capital, and identifying different sources of capital. Identifies the incentives, decision processes and criteria of different venture capital providers. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the life cycle of the new venture from startup to exit. 2. Identify the incentives of different parties involved in new venture, like founders, early employees, advisers and different types of investors. 3. Create a financial plan for a new venture, including cash flows and pro forma financial statements. 4. Analyze the need for new capital needed, and assess the timing, costs and benefits of different sources of capital. 5. Compare and employ the methods for valuing new ventures, focusing primarily on Discounted Cash Flow Method. 6. Explain the due diligence process for preparing for negotiations with potential investors. 7. List and compare the different options to exit the venture, and the timing of the exit. 8. Identify the structure of Venture Capital Funds and their fund raising process. 9. Create a pitch for a new venture or startup idea. Prerequisites: FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 4300. Real Estate Finance. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Covers mechanisms of real estate financing, sources of funds and financial institutions, governmental agencies, the framework for urban real estate investment decisions by individuals and institutions, the use of financing techniques, leverage, risk analysis and control, and taxation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the uniqueness of real estate markets. 2. Explain the legal foundations real estate investment. 3. Describe the difference between various real estate interests. 4. Construct amortization schedules and calculate the yield for various debt structures. 5. Apply the three major methods of appraisal. 6. Analyze the financial impact of various mortgage decision. 7. Value various types of real estate assets using the DCF method and calculate NPV and IRRs. 8. Evaluate the Legal and Ethical issues in Real Estate Finance. 9. Compare buy vs. rent decision. 10. Identify and calculate various financial ratios for real estate investment. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. FA.

FIN 4380. Financial Modeling and Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Applies economic theories to solve various problems in financial management and investments using a hands-on approach in building financial spreadsheet models in Microsoft Excel. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply design thinking approach to the process of financial modelling. 2. Identify and prioritize assumptions that are necessary for the financial modeling, analysis and decision making. 3. Organize model input data. 4. Apply advanced MS Excel modeling techniques and tools. 5. Apply sensitivity and scenario analysis to the financial models in order to improve financial decisions. 6. Synthesize and summarize model outputs, determining key findings that support the decision of the model user. 7. Apply VBA programming techniques in MS Excel for financial models. 8. Prepare graphical illustrations of model outputs. 9. Implement MS Excel error checking and debugging tools. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. FA.

FIN 4400. International Finance. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. A study of the international monetary system in its theoretical and institutional setting, the position of an individual business firm in conducting international trade, and procedures in financing international transactions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the macroeconomic and institutional foundations for international trade and finance, 2. Differentiate between different international monetary systems and compare the role of international monetary institutions in the world economy, 3. Differentiate between spot and forward foreign exchange markets and calculate currency exchange rates, 4. Analyze transaction, economic and translation exposure of international trade transactions and evaluate strategies to manage these exposures, 5. Distinguish between international equity markets and identify potential benefits of international diversifications, and 6. Differentiate the issues in financial management of multinational corporations (MNCs). Prerequisites: FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 4750. Portfolio Practicum. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing BS in Finance. Application of theory in portfolio formation, performance measurement and monitoring by giving students hands-on experience in managing investment portfolio. Major areas of investment portfolio management covered will include: portfolio objectives, asset allocation and security selection decisions, industry sector analysis, company analysis and valuation, portfolio formation, efficient transactions, performance evaluation, and ethics. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Survey the financial environment. 2. Evaluate the Company and Industry from a Top-down perspective. 3. Analyze Free Cash Flows of a potential investment. 4. Apply Comparative Methods for stock valuation. 5. Formulate an investment recommendation based on the analysis performed. 6. Relate risk to return and recognize arbitrage opportunities. 7. Analyze portfolio allocation and performance. 8. Construct an investment portfolio appropriate to the risk aversion and financial goals of an investor. 9. Discuss common ethics issues relating to personal and agent investing. Prerequisites: FIN 3750 (Grade B- or higher). SP.