Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE)

ECE 1200. MATLAB and Arduino. 1 Hour.

An introduction to MATLAB, Simulink, and Arduino for those with basic programming experience. This course teaches how to apply previously-learned programming principles within the MATLAB/Simulink environment through examples and programming assignments. Students also learn to program and interface various sensors and motors with Arduino microcontrollers. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate competence in basic programming principles in the MATLAB programming environment. 2. Construct satisfactory solutions to defined tasks within Simulink. 3. Program a microcontroller to take data from various types of sensors. 4. Program a microcontroller to control various types of motors such as servo, stepper, and DC motors. Prerequisites: CS 1400 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

ECE 2100. Semiconductor Devices. 3 Hours.

Introduction to semiconductor materials, physics, and devices. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Model and analyze semiconductor p-n junctions. 2. Analyze charge transport in semiconductor materials. 3. Model and analyze MOSFETs. 4. Design semiconductor process flows using knowledge of basic microfabrication processes. Prerequisite: MECH 2210 (Grade C- or higher). Corequisite: MATH 2250. SP.

ECE 2280. Microelectronics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to semiconductor theory and electronic device concepts to understand analog integrated circuits. Analysis of diodes, amplifiers, and transistors. Microelectronic analog circuit analysis and design using small-signal and large-signal techniques. Introduction to frequency analysis of microelectronic circuits using magnitude and phase response. Associated laboratory include design, building, troubleshooting, and simulation of semiconductor circuits and amplifiers. Inclusive Access Course Material (electronic book) fees may apply, see Fees tab under each course section for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze complex analog circuit problems with transistors, diodes, or other electronic elements. 2. Differentiate between different types of transistors and other electrical components. 3. Devise electrical circuits with multistage amplifiers to meet specified requirements. 4. Estimate analog circuit outputs using proper analysis techniques. Prerequisites: MECH 2210 and PHYS 2220 (Both grade C- or higher). Corequisites: ECE 2285. SP.

ECE 2285. Microelectronics Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of 2280. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Diagram and manipulate analog circuits in circuit modeling software. 2. Outline experimental results from laboratory work concisely and accurately. 3. Employ proper technique in using laboratory equipment and circuit components. 4. Assess analog circuit functionality based on experimental results. Corequisites: ECE 2280. SP.

ECE 2700. Digital Circuits. 3 Hours.

Introduction to digital design through both high level and low level topics and problems. Boolean logic, state machines, register-transfer level (TRL design), and timing analysis are all taught. Design of digital systems, including combinational and sequential circuits with physical realization through laboratory work. Use of computer-aided tools to design, minimize and simulate circuits. Inclusive Access Course Material (electronic book) fees may apply, see Fees tab under each course section for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Solve combinational logic circuits to determine circuit response. 2. Design logic circuits that satisfy design requirements. 3. Differentiate between the different logic components in their function within a logic circuit. 4. Demonstrate competency with computer-aided tools for the design and analysis of logic circuits. Prerequisites: MATH 1050 (Grade C- or higher) or equivalent placement score. Corequisites: ECE 2705. FA.

ECE 2705. Digital Circuits Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of ECE 2700. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the basic equipment and components used for logic circuit. 2. Explain the results from basic laboratory experiments of logic circuits. 3. Demonstrate proper use of laboratory equipment with appropriate precautionary measures. 4. Compare the results obtained in physical systems to those obtained from theoretical work. Course fee required. Corequisites: ECE 2700. FA.

ECE 3300. Electromagnetics & Transmission Lines. 3 Hours.

An analysis of electromagnetics including wave propagation, transmission line analysis, impedance matching, electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, plane waves, reflection, refraction, lossy media, and wireless communication systems. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Calculate voltages, currents, and impedances on transmission lines using time-domain and frequency-domain analysis. 2. Calculate electric and magnetic fields from charges, current distributions, and plane waves. 3. Design matching systems for transmission lines and plane waves. 4. Calculate a link budget for simple wireless communication systems. Prerequisites: MECH 2210 AND MATH 2250 (All Grade C- or higher). Corequisite: ECE 3305. FA.

ECE 3305. Electromagnetics & Transmission Lines Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of ECE 3300. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Acquire and analyze data from electromagnetic systems including transmission lines. 2. Evaluate uncertainty and/or error between experimental measurements and analytical/simulated predictions. Corequisite: ECE 3300. FA.

ECE 3500. Signals and Systems. 3 Hours.

Sampling of continuous-time systems. Transform domain analysis of circuits. Linear and time invariant systems in both continuous-time and discrete-time domains. Representation of systems using transfer functions, impulse-response functions, and frequency responses. Fourier analysis of continuous-time systems. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate time-invariant systems in both the time and frequency domains. 2. Formulate solutions to complex systems using appropriate transforms to reduce problem complexity. 3. Discriminate appropriate domains to solve linear, time-invariant systems. 4. Articulate the physical significance of the various domains and transforms. Prerequisites: MATH 2250 OR MATH 2270 AND MATH 2280; AND MECH 2210 (All grade C- or higher). SP.

ECE 3600. Power Electronics. 3 Hours.

Power electronics fundamentals including DC-DC converters, AC-DC converters, conduction and switching losses, feedback control of switch-mode power supplies, power factor correction, and power electronics design for applications. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Model and analyze DC to DC converters. 2. Model and analyze AC to DC converters. 3. Estimate heat dissipation in power electronics. 4. Design and analyze power electronic schemes for defined specifications. Prerequisites: MECH 2210 AND MECH 3200 (Grade C- or higher). Corequisite: ECE 3605. SP.

ECE 3605. Power Electronics Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of ECE 3600. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Acquire and analyze data from power electronics such as DC to DC and AC to DC converters. 2. Acquire and analyze data regarding heating in power electronics. 3. Design and prototype, in teams, a power electronics system that meets defined specifications. Corequisite: ECE 3600. SP.

ECE 3730. Embedded Systems I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to embedded system design with microcontrollers. Topics include hardware and software aspects of embedded systems, microcontroller architecture, serial and parallel I/O interfacing, analogy sensing, actuation, and interrupt synchronization. In the associated lab, student will design and prototype an embedded system according to design requirements. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Articulate software and hardware design considerations for embedded systems. 2. Analyze microcontroller, sensor, and actuator datasheets in the selection of embedded system components. 3. Use appropriate communication protocols to interface various analog and digital hardware. 4. Design embedded systems that satisfy criteria with respect to functionality, size and cost. Prerequisites: ECE 1200 OR MECH 1200; AND ECE 2700 (All Grade C- or higher). Corequisites: ECE 3735. FA.

ECE 3735. Embedded Systems I Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of 3730. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Plan effectively with team members to meet deadlines and fulfill tasks. 2. Evaluate different embedded system designs through experimentation. 3. Construct and test an embedded system according to design specifications. 4. Appraise an embedded system design using hardware and microcontroller specifications. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Plan effectively with team members to meet deadlines and fulfill tasks. 2. Evaluate different embedded system designs through experimentation. 3. Construct and test an embedded system according to design specifications. 4. Appraise an embedded system design using hardware and microcontroller specifications. Corequisites: ECE 3730. FA.

ECE 4000. EE Product Design I. 3 Hours.

First course in the product design series required for Electrical Engineering majors. Students work in teams to develop a product through customer needs identification, concept generation and selection, concept testing, benchmarking, design parameter specification, engineering analysis, and critical function prototyping. The course culminates in an alpha prototype and formal design review of the product with faculty and industry leaders. Dual listed with MECH 4000 and ECE 4005 (students may only take one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define and propose, in teams, solutions to a team-perceived problem using engineering design principles and ethics. 2. Formulate background for a team-defined project using prior work such as journal articles, patent databases, and/or benchmark data. 3. Propose project milestones and a plan to achieve project milestones. 4. Design and perform a feasibility study. 5. Prototype, in teams, an alpha solution to a team-defined problem. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ECE 2100 AND ECE 3300 AND ECE 3500 AND ECE 3600 (All Grade C- or higher). Corequisites: ENGL 3010. FA.

ECE 4005. CE Product Design I. 3 Hours.

First course in the product design series required for Computer Engineering majors. Students work in teams to develop a product through customer needs identification, concept generation and selection, concept testing, benchmarking, design parameter specification, engineering analysis, and critical function prototyping. The course culminates in an alpha prototype and formal design review of the product with faculty and industry leaders. Dual listed with MECH 4000 and ECE 4000 (students may only take one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define and propose, in teams, solutions to a team-perceived problem using engineering design principles and ethics. 2. Formulate background for a team-defined project using prior work such as journal articles, patent databases, and/or benchmark data. 3. Propose project milestones and a plan to achieve project milestones. 4. Design and perform a feasibility study. 5. Prototype, in teams, an alpha solution to a team-defined problem. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ECE 4730 and ECE 3500 and ECE 2280 (All Grade C- or higher). FA.

ECE 4010. EE Product Design II. 3 Hours.

Second course in the product design series required for Electrical Engineering majors. Student teams further develop their product through engineering analysis, beta testing, economic analysis, design for manufacturing, design reviews, and documentation. The course culminates in a final product that will be presented to the public at Engineering Design Day. Dual listed with MECH 4010 and ECE 4015 (students may only take one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate economic considerations of a team-defined problem. 2. Propose a design and/or improvement to a component and/or system using engineering analysis. 3. Prepare and present a technical oral and poster presentation. 4. Prototype, in teams, a beta solution to a team-defined problem. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ECE 4000 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

ECE 4015. CE Product Design II. 3 Hours.

Second course in the product design series required for Computer Engineering majors. Student teams further develop their product through engineering analysis, beta testing, economic analysis, design for manufacturing, design reviews, and documentation. The course culminates in a final product that will be presented to the public at Engineering Design Day. Dual listed with MECH 4010 and ECE 4010 (students may only take one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate economic considerations of a team-defined problem. 2. Propose a design and/or improvement to a component and/or system using engineering analysis. 3. Prepare and present a technical oral and poster presentation. 4. Prototype, in teams, a beta solution to a team-defined problem. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ECE 4005 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

ECE 4500. Digital Signal Processing. 3 Hours.

Covers discrete-time systems and signals, z-transforms, and discrete-time Fourier transforms. Other topics include finite-impulse response and infinite impulse response digital filter design, sampling, signal quantization, and spectral transformation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze complex systems using discrete-time filters. 2. Construct digital filters to meet specified requirements. 3. Test physical systems experimentally and compare to theoretical results. 4. Discriminate between appropriate uses of the discrete-time transforms and digital filters. Prerequisites: ECE 3500 and MATH 3400 (Both grade C- or higher). SP.

ECE 4730. Embedded Systems II. 3 Hours.

Presents advanced topics for embedded systems, including hardware and software for real-time systems. Topics include scheduling paradigms, synchronization, inter-process communication, feedback control, verification & validation, and issues in safety-critical embedded systems. The laboratory associated with the course includes labs in these topics and a design project for students. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Design a real-time embedded system with appropriate consideration for issues unique to real-time systems. 2. Describe communication protocols, verification & validation, and software architectures that are unique to real-time embedded systems. 3. Develop software for an embedded real-time system. 4. Analyze hardware for sensing and actuation based on needs for an embedded system. Prerequisites: ECE 3730 AND MECH 3200 (Both grade C- or higher). Corequisites: ECE 4735. SP.

ECE 4735. Embedded Systems II Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of 4730. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Integrate hardware and software in an embedded system that meets specified needs. 2. Consider trade-offs when selective actuators, sensors, and microcontrollers in embedded systems. 3. Identify errors in the software to run a real-time embedded system. 4. Defend in writing the choices in an embedded system design. Corequisites: ECE 4730. SP.

ECE 4800R. Independent Research. 1-3 Hours.

An independent research course that allows upper-level electrical and computer engineering students to work closely with a faculty member to explore engineering through research. Projects are chosen at the discretion of the faculty member. Students will have an opportunity to present their research at Engineering Design Day or similar venue. Repeatable up to 3 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and compile background pertaining to the research project. 2. Propose solutions pertaining to the research project using engineering design principles and/or the scientific method. 3. Model and analyze a system pertaining to the research project. 4. Design and conduct experiments and interpret associated results pertaining to the research project. 5. Draw conclusions and identify future work pertaining to the research project. Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

ECE 4990. Special Topics Lecture. 1-4 Hours.

Specialized topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering used to fulfill technical elective requirements. Repeatable up to 24 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Formulate and evaluate complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics. 2. Model, analyze, and design electrical/electronic/mechatronic systems that accomplish a specified task or objective.

ECE 4995. Special Topics Lab. 0.5-3 Hours.

Specialized topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering used to fulfill technical elective requirements. Repeatable up to 18 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Design experiments for electrical/electronic systems or processes, analyze experimental data, and make informed conclusions from the data. 2. Design, prototype, and troubleshoot electrical/electronic/mechatronic systems that accomplish a specified task or objective.